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Susan, Hespeler | September 1, 2017

We eat local, we act local, but how many of us read local?

Books written by local authors mirror back our own experience with the idea of something we can recognize and connect to. If they are set in the local community, we have an even greater attachment to them and they tell our story, preserving it for future generations.

It’s been said that a region speaks through its writers, and they speak for the place. In The River and the Railroad, David Menary sets his story in the fictional town of New Thunder, Ontario -– but it’s obvious to all who live here that the town is Galt, circa 1913. Reading about the exploits of Skiff and Owen you can still follow them today as they head from Dickson Park to the railroad crossing on Blenheim Road. The boys also give us an authentic take on what everyday life was like a century ago, so there’s no need to reach for a history book.

Menary’s book is fiction, but other writers use family stories which have been handed down as the basis for their books. Little Girl in the Mirror, by Cambridge author Tara Mondou, is the account of her mother’s childhood in Stratford, Ontario. Small-town Ontario in the 1950’s is brought to life through the eyes of young Cathy, and all the vintage details make for a memorable read.

If these titles whet your appetite and you want to read local, search local author in our catalogue for more suggestions, or visit a book signing where you can actually meet the author. They are always happy to talk about their books!

The Swan Riders book coverLittle Girl in the Mirror book coverBlank Canvas book coverGirl Runner book coverCanada's Favourite Recipes book cover