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Structural Impressionism

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  • Structural Impressionism. Photo Credit: Jack Winn, 2016.
    Structural Impressionism. Photo Credit: Jack Winn, 2016.
  • Structural Impressionism Buttons. Photo Credit: Amanda Langis, 2016.
    Structural Impressionism Buttons. Photo Credit: Amanda Langis, 2016.
  • Time Machine. Photo Credit: Jack Winn, 2016.
    Time Machine. Photo Credit: Jack Winn, 2016.
  • Structural Impressionism. Photo Credit: Jack Winn, 2016.
    Structural Impressionism. Photo Credit: Jack Winn, 2016.
  • Structural Impressionism. Photo Credit: Jack Winn, 2016.
    Structural Impressionism. Photo Credit: Jack Winn, 2016.
  • Fringe Custom Framing and Gallery. Photo Credit: Jack Winn, 2016.
    Fringe Custom Framing and Gallery. Photo Credit: Jack Winn, 2016.

Amanda Langis, Gallery Assistant | November 18, 2016

Last month, I had the privilege and delight of curating Structural Impressionism, a large solo exhibition by Jack Winn, at Fringe Custom Framing and Gallery in London, Ontario. Structural Impressionism is Winn’s contemplation upon the hypothetical ideas in the newest cosmological and quantum particle research. Inspired by his reading of time, space, interdimensionality, and ancient knowledge, Winn paints the world theorized by the scientific minds throughout the ages.

Forty-five artworks, including six sculptures, from the past five years of Winn’s production were chosen to represent the strength of character and forcefulness mirroring the power and mystery of elemental particles and the grand scale of the cosmos. The found object sculptures are provocative references to time and space. LED lit saucers, time machines, and flat earth models unlock new doors to critical thinking about our surroundings and our place in the universe. This series of works questions current formalized knowledge.

Recently, Winn’s paintings have been influenced by Jean-Michel Basquiat. The crown, spaceship, mathematical symbols, and personal codes frequent Winn’s works interact with the clandestineness of quantum physics. The use of sea-foam, a colour that is verging on industrial green, is prominent in almost all paintings from the last eighteen months. The paint’s illuminance is distinctive in “Planet Locator – Earth,” a large scale 7’ x 12’ painting that contemplates what Stonehenge’s role may be in our reality. Acrylic, automotive paint, oil, oil stick, and spray paint are used to create tension that is reflected within the materials. The order and timing of applying the paints determine how they will react with each other.

For this exhibition, the artist and I visited Idea Exchange’s Clemens Mill location to use the button machine. The image used for the buttons, a self-portrait, references Basquiat’s inspiration on the artist. The buttons will be available for free at Fringe Gallery.

Structural Impressionism continues to December 2, 2016. An artist's talk is scheduled for Friday, November 18th at 7:00pm as well as a closing reception on December 2nd at 7:00pm at Fringe Gallery, 1742 Hyde Park Road, London. All are welcome.