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Ian Carr-Harris

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Biography

Ian Carr-Harris is an artist based in Toronto, Canada, whose work has been exhibited nationally and internationally since 1971. Significant exhibitions include the Venice Biennale (1984), Documenta,...

Ian Carr-Harris is an artist based in Toronto, Canada, whose work has been exhibited nationally and internationally since 1971. Significant exhibitions include the Venice Biennale (1984), Documenta, Kassel, Germany (1987), the Canadian Biennial at the National Gallery, Ottawa (1989), the Sydney Biennale, Sydney, Australia (1990) and the Montreal Biennale (1998). In 2007 he was named a recipient (Laureate) of the Governor-General's Awards in the Visual and Media Arts. He was educated at Queen’s University, Kingston (Modern History), the University of Toronto (Library Science) and the Ontario College of Art (Sculpture).  He is a life member of the RCA and a current member of the Chelsea Arts Club in London, UK, and is represented by the Susan Hobbs Gallery in Toronto. He teaches at the Ontario College of Art and Design in the Sculpture/Installation and Criticism and Curatorial Practice Programs.  His writing has included reviews and articles for journals and magazines, including Parachute, Vanguard, Canadian Art, Prefix, and the London (UK) magazine Contemporary; he is a contributing editor for Canadian Art magazine, Toronto.  He was a founding Board member of one of the first artist-run galleries, A Space, Toronto in 1971 and of one of Canada’s premier international exhibiting space, The Power Plant. He has served on the Board of the Art Gallery of Ontario, and the Board of the web-based CCCA (Centre for Canadian Contemporary Art), where his work can be viewed on line through www.ccca.ca as well as through the Susan Hobbs Gallery.

Carr-Harris says "My work situates itself in that space we reserve for our recognition that the histories and structures which we use to give definition to identity are themselves contingent and fluid, no less elusive than the identities we seek to secure. Through shifts of emphasis, the work seeks to disturb our field of knowledge while leaving it also apparently intact. ”







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