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2017 Booker Prize

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The Man Booker Prize is the leading literary award in the English speaking world, and has brought recognition, reward and readership to outstanding fiction for over four decades. Each year, the prize is awarded to what is, in the opinion of the judges, the best novel of the year written in English and published in the UK.

Saunders, George
Lincoln in the Bardo

2017 Winner "‘The form and style of this utterly original novel, reveals a witty, intelligent, and deeply moving narrative. This tale of the haunting and haunted souls in the afterlife of Abraham Lincoln’s young son paradoxically creates a vivid and lively evocation of the characters that populate this other world. Lincoln in the Bardo is both rooted in, and plays with history, and explores the meaning and experience of empathy.’ " (Lola, Baroness Young, 2017 Chair of judges)

Smith, Ali
Autumn

“Ali Smith has a beautiful mind. [Autumn is] unbearably moving in its playful, strange, soulful assessment of what it means to be alive at a somber time.” —The New York Times

Mozley, Fiona
Elmet

"A cleverly constructed rural Gothic fable written in palatably simple prose . . . Elmet is a marvelous achievement" TLS

Hamid, Mohsin
Exit west

“Lyrical and urgent, the globalist novel evokes the dreams and disillusionments that follow Saeed and Nadia…and peels away the dross of bigotry to expose the beauty of our common humanity.” O, the Oprah Magazine

Fridlund, Emily.
History of wolves

“Electrifying . . . History of Wolves isn’t a typical thriller any more than it’s a typical coming-of-age novel; Fridlund does a remarkable job transcending genres without sacrificing the suspense that builds steadily in the book . . . [it] is as beautiful and as icy as the Minnesota woods where it's set, and with her first book, Fridlund has already proven herself to be a singular talent.” NPR.

Auster, Paul
4 3 2 1

“A stunningly ambitious novel, and a pleasure to read. Auster’s writing is joyful even in the book’s darkest moments, and never ponderous or showy. . . . An incredibly moving, true journey.” NPR