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If You Liked Moon of the Crusted Snow

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If you enjoyed the One Book, One Community title for 2020, Moon of the Crusted Snow, check out these titles from Idea Exchange collections. Explore gripping post-apocalyptic worlds, engage with First Nations writers and perspectives, and discover new visions of our future world.

 

Dumont, Dawn
Glass beads

These short stories interconnect the friendships of four First Nations people -- Everett Kaiswatim, Nellie Gordon, Julie Papequash, and Nathan (Taz) Mosquito -- as the collection evolves over two decades against the cultural, political, and historical backdrop of the 90s and early 2000s. These young people are among the first of their families to live off the reserve for most of their adult lives, and must adapt and evolve.

Dimaline, Cherie
The marrow thieves

In a futuristic world ravaged by global warming, people have lost the ability to dream, and the dreamlessness has led to widespread madness. The only people still able to dream are North America's Indigenous people, and it is their marrow that holds the cure for the rest of the world. But getting the marrow, and dreams, means death for the unwilling donors. Driven to flight, a fifteen-year-old and his companions struggle for survival, attempt to reunite with loved ones and take refuge from the "recruiters" who seek them out to bring them to the marrow-stealing "factories."

Orange, Tommy
There there

Jacquie Red Feather is newly sober and trying to make it back to the family she left behind in shame. Dene Oxendene is pulling his life together after his uncle's death and has come to work at the powwow to honour his uncle's memory. Opal Viola Victoria Bear Shield has come to watch her nephew Orvil Red Feather, who has taught himself traditional Indian dance through YouTube videos and has come to the powwow to dance in public for the very first time. There will be glorious communion, and a spectacle of sacred tradition and pageantry. And there will be sacrifice, and heroism, and unspeakable loss.

Talaga, Tanya.
Seven fallen feathers

2018 winner

Presents the story of seven Indigenous high school students who died in Thunder Bay, Ontario from 2010 to 2011. They were sent hundreds of kilometres away from their families because there was no sufficient high school on their reserves.

Vermette, Katherena
The break

When a Métis woman sees a possible crime she telephones the police. Told from the perspectives of various people connected to this violence in a Metis community, we hear their stories leading up to that fateful night.

Robinson, Eden.
Son of a trickster

Jared is only sixteen but feels like he is the one who must stabilize his family's life, even look out for his elderly neighbours. But he struggles to keep everything afloat...and sometimes he blacks out. And he puzzles over why his maternal grandmother has never liked him, why she says he's the son of a trickster, that he isn't human. Mind you, ravens speak to him--even when he's not stoned. You think you know Jared, but you don't.

Wagamese, Richard.
Medicine walk

Set in the dramatic landscape of the BC Interior, 16 year-old Franklin Starlight is called to visit his father, Eldon, a man he barely knows. The rare moments they have shared trouble Frank, but, he answers the call, a son's duty to a father. He finds Eldon dying of liver failure after years of heavy drinking. Eldon asks his son to take him into the mountains, so he may be buried in the traditional Ojibway manner.

Kamal, Sheena.
The lost ones

Nora Watts has experienced a lot of pain in her lifetime, growing up part white and part native in a foster system that never cared for her. When the daughter she put up for adoption goes missing, she scours the streets of Vancouver for answers and must confront her darkest demons.

King, Thomas
The inconvenient Indian

2014 Winner - Histories of North America’s Native Peoples abound, but few are as subversive, entertaining, well-researched, hilarious, enraging, and finally as hopeful as this very personal take on our long relationship with the “inconvenient” Indian.

Kinew, Wab
The reason you walk

When his father was given a diagnosis of terminal cancer, Winnipeg broadcaster and musician Wab Kinew decided to spend a year reconnecting with the accomplished but distant aboriginal man who'd raised him. Born to an Anishinaabe father and a non-native mother, he has a foot in both cultures. He is a Sundancer, an academic, a former rapper, a hereditary chief, and an urban activist. Kinew writes affectingly of his own struggles in his twenties to find the right path, eventually giving up a self-destructive lifestyle to passionately pursue music and martial arts. From his unique vantage point, he offers an inside view of what it means to be an educated aboriginal living in a country that is just beginning to wake up to its aboriginal history and living presence.