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Dialogues with the Transformative City: The Architecture of Lapointe Magne (1992-2012)

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February 27 - April 7, 2013
Institute de tourisme et d'hôtellerie du Québec (curtain wall, detail). Photo: Michel Brunelle
Institute de tourisme et d'hôtellerie du Québec (curtain wall, detail). Photo: Michel Brunelle

Idea Exchange
Design at Riverside
7 Melville Street S, Cambridge, ON
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This is a rare opportunity outside of Quebec to view an in-depth exhibition on the work of acclaimed Montreal architects, Lapoint Magne.

Guest curator Marie-Paule Macdonald (associate professor, Waterloo Architecture) presents an array of benchmark projects by Lapointe Magne et associés including the National Circus School, the Gatineau Sports Centre, and the Institut de tourisme et d’hôtellerie du Québec. These projects represent an important contribution to Canada’s cityscapes and as they “enter into public familiarity, will invite participation and dialogue.”

Dialogues with the Transformative City was conceived and produced by Maison de l’architecture du Québec (MAQ) in collaboration with Lapointe Magne et associés (LMA). MAQ would also like to acknowledge and thank the following organizations for their support of this project: CARLYLE – CÉRAGRÈS – DESSAU – GERPRO CONSTRUCTION – GROUPE TEQ – LUXTEC – MAGIL CONSTRUCTION – SOPREMA – VALTEC INC – VERREAULT – VICWEST.

Dialogues with the Transformative City, Lapointe Magne et associés (1992-2012) is the second exhibition and catalogue in the MONOGRAPHIES MAQ Series. This series offers in-depth analysis of the past two decades of work by influential Québec architects, situating them within a larger international context.

Opening Reception: Thursday, February 26 at 6:30pm, remarks at 7:00pm

Lapointe Magne Associés
Lapointe Magne Associés (LMA) is a rare example of longetivity in the québecois context, as the original firm was founded in 1955. For 25 and 40 years respectively, various incarnations of the firm...

Lapointe Magne Associés (LMA) is a rare example of longetivity in the québecois context, as the original firm was founded in 1955. For 25 and 40 years respectively, various incarnations of the firm gravitated around John Bland, then director of the McGill School of Architecture and Roy Emile LeMoyne also an influential teacher at McGill. Michel Lapointe and Robert Magne played a key role in the transition of the firm starting in 1984 and, culminating with the construction of the McCord Museum extension in 1992, which according to architectural critic David Theodore, proved to be a benchmark not only for LMA, but for the Quebec architectural community at large. Working principally in the public sector, the firm presently includes four partners with approximately 15 architects and technicians.

Frédéric Dubé, partner: Recipient of the A.F.Dunlop travelling scholarship from McGill University for overall academic achievement in 1986, Fréderic Dubé was also awarded the Canada Council Barcelona studio award in 1990. In parallel to his professional activities, he is involved in architectural education as a teacher or invited critic at various universities (Montréal, McGill, UQAM and Waterloo). He was principal coordinator of the Dialogues with the Transformative City exhibition at Design at Riverside.

Marie-Paule Macdonald
Marie-Paule Macdonald obtained a Bachelor of Architecture from Dalhousie University and a post-professional graduate degree from the Institut Français d’Urbanisme, Université de Paris VIII,...

Marie-Paule Macdonald obtained a Bachelor of Architecture from Dalhousie University and a post-professional graduate degree from the Institut Français d’Urbanisme, Université de Paris VIII, studying with Françoise Choay. She is a registered architect, and member of the Order of Architects of Québec. She is an associate professor at Waterloo Architecture and has also coordinated graduate design studios in Montréal. Ms. Macdonald is an established writer and researcher in the fields of architecture and urbanism and has published numerous works in print and online.



  • Dialogues with the Transformative City: The Architecture of Lapointe Magne (1992-2012), (installation), 2013. Photo: Peter Ross
    Dialogues with the Transformative City: The Architecture of Lapointe Magne (1992-2012), (installation), 2013. Photo: Peter Ross
  • Dialogues with the Transformative City: The Architecture of Lapointe Magne (1992-2012), (installation), 2013. Photo: Peter Ross
    Dialogues with the Transformative City: The Architecture of Lapointe Magne (1992-2012), (installation), 2013. Photo: Peter Ross
  • Dialogues with the Transformative City: The Architecture of Lapointe Magne (1992-2012), (installation), 2013. Photo: Peter Ross
    Dialogues with the Transformative City: The Architecture of Lapointe Magne (1992-2012), (installation), 2013. Photo: Peter Ross
  • Dialogues with the Transformative City: The Architecture of Lapointe Magne (1992-2012), (installation), 2013. Photo: Peter Ross
    Dialogues with the Transformative City: The Architecture of Lapointe Magne (1992-2012), (installation), 2013. Photo: Peter Ross
  • Dialogues with the Transformative City: The Architecture of Lapointe Magne (1992-2012), (installation), 2013. Photo: Peter Ross
    Dialogues with the Transformative City: The Architecture of Lapointe Magne (1992-2012), (installation), 2013. Photo: Peter Ross
  • Dialogues with the Transformative City: The Architecture of Lapointe Magne (1992-2012), (installation), 2013. Photo: Peter Ross
    Dialogues with the Transformative City: The Architecture of Lapointe Magne (1992-2012), (installation), 2013. Photo: Peter Ross

Curatorial Writing

Introduction  by Marie-Paule MacDonald, Curator.  Anticipating :  Last century, science fiction writer William Gibson quipped, 'the future is already here, it’s just unevenly distributed'. It is...

Introduction 
by Marie-Paule MacDonald, Curator. 

Anticipating

Last century, science fiction writer William Gibson quipped, 'the future is already here, it’s just unevenly distributed'. It is tempting to add, not only the future, but the past and present are already here too. This temporal mix makes the contemporary city an exhilarating, dynamic mash-up.

A key aspect of design involves anticipating the future. The architects Lapointe Magne & Associés recognize, and their work reveals the nuanced, layered complexity and multiple temporalities of place. If urban context is about discontinuities in time, a liveable city is all about connectedness and continuity in space.

Dialogues with the Transformative City provides a glimpse into the diversity and breadth of Lapointe Magne & Associés’ architectural practice and demonstrates through an array of building types set into a matrix, the phenomenal mobilizing of knowledge involved in creating architecture. Architectural creation involves generating new form, requiring the synthesis of disparate information and divergent thinking. Even as it incorporates new materials, ideas and processes, it must retain existing elements of its local environment, and hold on to classic ideals about the public realm, collective values, social and cultural capital.

After construction is completed and the buildings occupied, the design slips into daily use and enters into public familiarity. It is a new phase of ‘reception of architecture’. This exhibition presents a material and temporal index of this recent past, and refocuses and anticipates reception and dialogue.

The visitor is invited to delve deeper into the documentation provided for several edifices that display flexible approaches for fitting into the city context. Lightboxes flash views of the work, and a video presentation moves through various spaces, highlighting collaborations with artists whose sculptural work has been incorporated into the built form. Architecture anticipates transforming a site even while enacting change. This exhibition looks forward while presenting the ‘just-past’.




Related Programming

Lecture on Dialogues with the Transformative City
Idea Exchange, Design at Riverside
Thursday, March 21, 2013 - 6:30-7:30pm
Read More»


Funders

City of Cambridge Canada Council for the Arts Ontario Arts CouncilWaterloo Architecture